Forever English Lessons

Forever English Lessons

An upper intermediate English course with ‘Forever’

These lessons are designed for upper intermediate or advanced students, and they test different grammatical structures each class, in addition to revising the vocabulary found in each episode of the TV show. I advise you to read the questions before watching the episode. Then, watch the episode, complete the exercises and check your answers. Don’t forget to activate all the new words and grammar by retelling the episode to your teacher or friend.

Episode 1
Episode 2

Series 1, Episode 1. Forever English Lessons

Henry Morgan (immortal)
Abe (Henry’s friend)
Detective Martinez
Hans Koehler (the owner of the finger print found on the driver’s neck)
Lucas (Henry’s assistant in the morgue)

Comprehension

1) What deductions does he make about the first girl on the subway?
2) When does our hero’s story begin?
3) What happens when our hero dies, sine that moment on the ship?
4) Who knows Henry’s secret? How?
5) What does the lieutenant suggest caused the subway accident?
6) What deductions does Henry make concerning the Detective Martinez?
7) What was the cause of death of the driver, according to Henry?
8) Who calls Henry, and what does he say? How does Henry react?
9) What does Detective Martinez notice on the security camera footage?
10) What does Henry receive in the mail?
11) How does Henry test the blood for toxins?
12) How does Henry persuade the Detective that he may not have been responsible for the crash?
13) What does Henry find on the corpse, and who does it belong to?
14) What do they find at Hans Koehler’s house?
15) What do the police believe is Hans Koehler’s motive?
16) Why was Koehler using ethanol?
17) What kind of phone call does Henry get at the end of the show?

Match the words in the two columns to make phrases from the show

 

a smudge with a disease
a fast acting obsession
to be infected is potent
a soluble of chocolate
to sneak (snuck, snuck) of death
the toxin poison
traces of off / away (leave quietly)
the cause a subway railing
a macabre vomit
impaled by a conclusion
to rule for heresy
to be hanged s.t out (exclude from a list)
to draw compound

 

Put the collocations in the following sentences

 

You have a ____ of chocolate on your face.
He’s not ____ with cholera! I swear it.
She ____ off quietly, the next morning.
There were ____ of vomit on the driver’s corpse.
The ____ of death was a heart attack
I’ve become a student of death, but not out of some ____ obsession, but purely for research.
This time I was ____ by a subway railing.
172 years ago I was hanged for ____, and I don’t want to make the same mistake again.
The toxin in his blood is still ____. You will feel it, if you inject it into your body.
It turns out to be a fast acting ____ called aconite.
So, Detective, what conclusions can you ____ from this?
Well, perhaps you’re a complete sociopath, and you want to be caught. I’m not ____ this possibility out.
He used ethanol to make the compound ____.

Grammar

FIRST CONDITIONAL: IF + PRESENT SIMPLE / WILL or WON’T (or modal verb) + infinitive

Use first conditional to talk about likely situations in the present.

SECOND CONDITIONAL: IF + PAST SIMPLE / WOULD or WOULDN’T (or modal verb) + infinitive

Use second conditional to talk about unlikely situations in the present.

THIRD CONDITIONAL: IF + PAST PERFECT / WOULD or WOULDN’T (or modal verb) + HAVE + 3rd form

Use third conditional to talk about unlikely situations in the past.

 

Put the following sentences into different conditional forms:

1) If your game ____ death, go where the action is. (be)
2) If this corpse ____ any longer, he most certainly ____of a heart attack. (live, die)
3) If they ____ more about you, their opinion ____. (know, change)
4) If we ____ out what kind of poison he used, then we ____ out a time frame for when the injection took place. (figure, work)
5) The toxin in his blood is still potent. You ____ it, if you ____ it into your body. (feel, inject)
6) Wouldn’t it be ironic if this time I actually ____? (die) (very rare mixed 1st/2nd form)
7) If I ____ to kill someone, I ____ polonium. (be going, use)
8) If he ____ our only suspect, we ____ looking for another (be, start)

Discussion questions

  • What would you spend your time doing, if you had the same immortal gift?
  • Do you think immortality would be a blessing, or a curse?
  • If you had the choice, what kind of death would you prefer? Which ways would you rule out?
  • What do you think is the most common cause of death?

Answers:

1) He deduces she is Russian (Russian chocolates!), she plays the cello (indentations on the fingers) and she has a performance tonight (her shirt is moist and so she has recently had a shower). A series of lucky guesses J
2) It starts 200 years ago, when he is thrown off a ship for daring to defend one of his patients. The ship’s crew suspected that his patient had cholera.
3) He awakes the next morning, naked, and in water.
4) Abe knows his secret. Fate brought them together years ago.
5) The conductor (driver) had a heart attack, just before impact. They will test the corpse for alcohol, and if they find some it will become a manslaughter case.
6) He deduces that her husband died recently. Her ring is no longer on her finger, but she can’t be divorced because her ring is round her neck. He assumes it is recent because he can see she is drinking nowadays.
7) The body has foam on the lungs which suggests that he may have been poisoned.
8) Someone who knows that he survived the train crash, and so someone who knows that he is immortal. Henry gets scared (he remembers the time he was hanged for heresy) and wants to run away to another country
9) She notices henry Morgan getting on the same train which crashed.
10) He found a newspaper and a message (QED which was to be demonstrated). This showed Henry that this man killed everyone on the train to prove that Henry is immortal, and wouldn’t die.
11) He injects it into his blood, and he immediately dies. It turns out to be a fast acting poison called aconite.
12) He reminds her that he was the man who first told her that the driver had been poisoned (even though she was hoping he’d died of a heart attack)
13) He finds a fingerprint. He suspects it belongs to the murderer. The police trace the print to a guy named Hans Kohler.
14) They find aconite. (poison)
15) The subway driver had killed Hans’ wife years earlier, and so he simply did this for revenge.
16) He wants to make the compound soluble so that he can put it in the ventilation system, and murder a lot of people.
17) He gets a call from the same guy as earlier (his fan). The guy claims that he has the same curse as Henry: he is immortal.

 

a smudge of chocolate
a fast acting poison
to be infected with a disease
a soluble compound
to sneak (snuck, snuck) off / away (leave quietly)
the toxin is potent
traces of vomit
the cause of death
a macabre obsession
impaled by a subway railing
to rule s.t out (exclude from a list)
to be hanged for heresy
to draw a conclusion

 

Put the collocations in the following sentences

You have a smudge of chocolate on your face.
He’s not infected with cholera! I swear it.
She snuck off quietly, in the morning.
There were traces of vomit on the driver’s corpse.
The cause of death was a heart attack
I’ve become a student of death, but not out of some macabre obsession, but purely for research.
This time I was impaled by a subway railing.
172 years ago I was hanged for heresy, and I don’t want to make the same mistake again.
The toxin in his blood is still potent. You will feel it, if you inject it into your body.
It turns out to be a fast acting poison called aconite.
So, Detective, what conclusions can you draw from this?
Well, perhaps you’re a complete sociopath, and you want to be caught. I’m not ruling this possibility out.
He used ethanol to make the compound soluble.

Put the following sentences into different conditional forms:

1) If your game is death, go where the action is.
2) If this man had lived any longer, he most certainly would have died of a heart attack.
3) If they knew more about you, their opinion would change.
4) If we figure out what kind of poison he used, then we’ll work out a time frame for when the injection took place.
5) The toxin in his blood is still potent. You will feel it, if you inject it into your body.
6) Wouldn’t it be ironic if this time I actually die? (very rare mixed 1st/2nd form)
7) If I was going to kill someone, I would use polonium.
8) If he’s our only suspect, we’ll start looking for another

Series 1, Episode 2 Forever English Lessons

Characters

Henry Morgan (immortal)
Abe (Henry’s friend)
Detective Martinez
Vicky Hulquist (Girl who fell from the bridge)
Professor Browning (Vicky’s classics professor)
Miranda Browning (the professor’s wife)
Lucas (Henry’s assistant in the morgue)

Comprehension

1) What was the cause of death of the first corpse?

2) And what is suspicious (according to Henry) about the corpse supposed to have committed suicide?

3) What does Henry find on the bridge?

4) What does Henry’s assistant find under one of her nails?

5) What conclusions does Henry draw when he and Detective Martinez visit Vicky’s professor?
6) What do they discover when they test the professors DNA?

7) Why do they discover when they visit the professor’s wife?

8) What does Henry become convinced of when they are interrogating the professor?

9) What happened in the hotel Montoliogne in 1945?

10) What do they find in Vicky’s mouth?

11) What happens to Professor Browning? Why is it suspicious?

12) Who do they see on the security footage?

13) Who killed the professor, and Vicky? Why?

14) Who calls Henry at the end?

Match the words on the left with the definitions on the right

 

witness To spoil
raucous To dissuade
A power outage To compensate
A sedentary existence Video recordings
To cling on Something which makes you suffer (often a disease)
To ruin Someone who sees the crime
To discourage Loud and noisy with lots of commotion
To adopt To surprise
To make up for A loss of power over a large area
To haunt To entice into a trap
condolences To strike someone with your head
To startle To grip (tightly)
An affliction Disloyalty. A violation of trust
Circumstantial evidence To officially become the guardian of a child
betrayal Something done with attention to details
meticulously To mean / imply
To take great pains To cause repeated suffering / anxiety
To lure To make a great effort
To head butt Sympathy or sadness, offered when someone dies
To be released on bail Indirect evidence
To get at A life of inactivity
To slit wrists / throat To be provisionally released from police custody
footage To cut (often fatally)

 

Put the collocations in the following sentences

 

  • He assumed that the power ____ was his satellite dish, which had malfunctioned.
  • Perhaps she was trying to ____ on the bridge before she fell.
  • There was a football game on TV the previous night which was rather a ____ affair.
  • Living a ____ existence can be both boring and dangerous.
  • I’m sorry to have ____ your evening with this bad news, Detective.
  • I’m so sorry for your loss. This is why we ____ families from seeing the body.
  • He will go to an orphanage, unless someone were to fall in love and ____ him.
  • Nothing can ____ up for the loss of a child.
  • The feeling that it doesn’t make sense will ____them forever.
  • I’m sorry: I didn’t mean to ____ you. (surprise)
  • I’d like to offer my sincere ____ for your professor’s death.
  • He claims to have the same terrible ____ as me; he claims to be immortal.
  • We have lots of evidence connecting the professor and Vicky, but it is all ____.
  • It must have been difficult sitting next to your husband and watching a performance about ____.
  • Someone planned this murder ____and took great ____ to make it look accidental.
  • Someone must have ____ her onto that bridge.
  • What are you ____ at, Henry? We don’t understand.
  • We need to look at the security footage, and see if there was an intruder.

Grammar

INVERSION

1) Questions, echo questions, question tags, so/neither

 

Are you sure?  Yes, so am I

You don’t know him, do you?

I found it yesterday. Did you? So did I

 

2) Negative adverbs (At no time, not once, never…)

 

Never have I seen such a wonderful view

At no time did he offer any help

Under no circumstances should he take any exercise

 

3) More negative adverbs (No sooner, seldom, rarely, barely, hardly, scarcely, only, little)

 

Only later did I learn the truth

Little do you know…

 

4) 2nd and 3rd conditional

 

Had I known it was your birthday, I would have bought you a present

 

Were I a rich man, I would buy myself a yacht

 

5) So / such

 

So helpful was he that I tipped him generously

Such a long distance was it, that we decided to take the train

 

Use inversions in the following sentences:

1) ___ ___ jumped from the bridge, she would have fallen forwards.

2) You understand me, ___ ___ detective?

3) No sooner ___ ___ arrived at the hospital than they insisted on seeing their daughter.

4) Little ___ ___ know, I’ve never been bothered by heights.

5) ___ ___ find out when the paper was made?

6) Seldom ___ ___ seen a crime scene like this.

7) So upset ___ ___, she came to discourage him from jumping off the bridge

8) ___ ___ not been lured to the bridge, she wouldn’t have been killed.

9) At no time ___ ___ offer his sincere condolences.

10) ___ ___ to adopt a child, I would name him after my uncle.

Discussion questions

 

  • When was the last time you had a raucous party?
  • Have you ever witnessed a crime?
  • How often do you have a power outage? Where do you keep torches and candles?
  • Do you live a sedentary lifestyle?
  • Are you a meticulous worker, or do you miss little details?


Answers:

1) Clearly an axe in the head. But the manner of death was accidental. He tried to climb his house to chop down some braches (in order to fix his satellite dish). He slipped, fell, and the axe fell in his head.
2) She has lead paint under her nails which show that she tried to cling onto the bridge. She also has scuff marks which indicate signs of struggle. And lastly she has injuries which show she was facing the bridge at the moment of impact. Henry claims that suicides always jump forwards and not backwards.
3) He found scratch marks made by the victim’s nails. He also found a second set of footprints. And some kind of large metal ring, perhaps to secure someone to the bridge.
4) He found skin particles, possibly belonging to someone she scratched before dying.
5) He concludes they were having an affair. He had seen cigarette stains on Vicky’s sheets, and yet she didn’t smoke; but her professor did. Also, she was wearing his scarf in the photo in her room.
6) It matches the DNA of the skin found under Vicky’s fingernails.
7) They discover that he didn’t go to the opera. She had given him a false alibi.
8) He becomes convinced that he is innocent and telling the truth. He didn’t kill her. He broke up with her, but he didn’t kill her.
9) He almost broke up with his girlfriend, but she wouldn’t let go of him.
10) They find human skin.
11) Because the incision marks are in the wrong direction. Also, there is evidence that the professor was sedated when he died. And finally, the suicide note had a grammatical error which the professor wouldn’t have made.
12) They see Miranda Browning (the professor’s wife)
13) It was one of the students from the classics department. He was jealous and angry that his name wasn’t on the paper translating the codex. He called Vicky and asked her to come to the bridge. He claimed that he was going to kill himself. So she came to save him. But he killed her, and kept himself on the bridge with a harness. Later he killed the professor but made it look like a suicide. And now he can put his name on the paper.
14) A man who calls himself ‘Adam’, and who claims to suffer from the same affliction as Henry: the curse of immortality. He claims to be 2000 years old.

 

 

witness Someone who sees the crime
raucous Loud and noisy with lots of commotion
A power outage A loss of power across a large area
A sedentary existence A life of inactivity
To cling To hold tight to something
To ruin To spoil
To discourage To dissuade
To adopt To officially become the guardian of a child
To make up for To compensate
To haunt To cause repeated suffering / anxiety
condolences Sympathy or sadness, offered when someone dies
To startle To surprise
An affliction Something which makes you suffer (often a disease)
Circumstantial evidence Indirect evidence
betrayal Disloyalty. A violation of trust
meticulously Something done with attention to details
To take great pains To make a great effort
To lure To entice into a trap
To headbutt To strike someone with your head
To be released on bail To be provisionally released from police custody
To get at to mean or imply
To slit wrists / throat To cut (often fatally)
footage Video recordings

Put the collocations in the following sentences

 

  • He assumed that the power outage was his satellite dish, which had malfunctioned.
  • Perhaps she was trying to cling on the bridge before she fell.
  • There was a football game on TV the previous night which was rather a raucous affair.
  • Living a sedentary existence can be both boring and dangerous.
  • I’m sorry to have ruined your evening with this bad news, Detective.
  • I’m so sorry for your loss. This is why we discourage families from seeing the body.
  • He will go to an orphanage, unless someone were to fall in love and adopt him.
  • Nothing can make up for the loss of a child.
  • The feeling that it doesn’t make sense will haunt them forever.
  • I’m sorry: I didn’t mean to startle you. (surprise)
  • I’d like to offer my sincere condolences for your professor’s death.
  • He claims to have the same terrible affliction as me; he claims to be immortal.
  • We have lots of evidence connecting the professor and Vicky, but it is all circumstantial.
  • It must have been difficult sitting next to your husband and watching a performance about betrayal.
  • Someone planned this murder meticulously and took great pains to make it look accidental.
  • Someone must have lured her onto that bridge.
  • What are you getting at Henry? We don’t understand.
  • We need to look at the security footage, and see if there was an intruder.

1) Had she jumped from the bridge, she would have fallen forwards.

2) You understand me, don’t you detective?

3) No sooner had they arrived at the hospital than they insisted on seeing their daughter.

4) Little did you know, I’ve never been bothered by heights.

5) Did you find out when the paper was made?

6) Seldom have I seen a crime scene like this.

7) So upset was she, she came to discourage him from jumping off the bridge

8) Had she not been lured to the bridge, she wouldn’t have been killed.

9) At no time did he offer his sincere condolences.

10) Were I to adopt a child, I would name him after my uncle.

More of these English lessons coming soon…

If you have enjoyed this English lesson, please try my English lessons for other TV shows, including Sherlock, IT Crowd and Willy Fogg:

English lessons for the IT Crowd: intermediate level
English lessons for Sherlock (UK): upper intermediate level
English lessons for Sherlock (US): advanced level
English lessons for Willy Fogg: pre intermediate level
Learn English Online with Blackadder: upper intermediate level